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Tag: issues

More controls overcome – drinking and driving workarounds

On my run today I noticed the number of alcohol nip bottles along the roads. Each time I saw one, I would see another a little further along the way. At no point was I able to run without seeing one. This was a 5 mile out and back, for a total of 10 miles.

Drinking and driving is illegal. Having an open alcohol container in the passenger compartment is also illegal. Rather than being economical in consumption of alcohol while driving, these people must be buying several small bottles. When they need their “fix” they knock one down and toss it out of their car window. Their total time blatantly breaking the law – less than 60 seconds.

If they get pulled over by the police between their nips they only have several small bottles still sealed. No law was broken. I thought about this as I ran. As I posted a few weeks ago, most controls are overcome. They force people to be more creative.

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The waiting is the hardest part

Anticipatory stress is the worst stress. It’s generally more harmful to our health than the actual event we stress over. It keeps us from sleeping. We’re not present with our family, friends, or colleagues. Our mind is stuck in an endless loop of re-runs that deny us of peace.

Dig into the issue and identify the root cause. Confront it as soon as you can. Address the issue, not the person. Do it now.

After you confront it you can move forward without all the extra emotional baggage. Most of the time the issue will be a tempest in a teapot.

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Choosing the right tool (or person) for your current problem

All of us will need someone to help us at various points in life. It can be simple help, like how to find a cross-street while in a strange city. Or complicated, like what to do with the rest of our lives.

Make sure you pick the right person to provide the type of help you need. Asking an uncle who spent a career assembling widgets on a factory floor won’t help you much if you’re trying to resolve an issue with a challenging colleague or manager. Their skills may be more around the mechanical issues that arise in your life.

Aligning your needs with the expertise of the person you’re engaging will save both of you time and energy. Keep this in mind when you’re asked to help someone else. If you lack the context or expertise needed, let the person know this. Offer to connect them to someone who can provide better insight into resolving their issues.

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